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Getting the Most Out of Your Winter Holidays

No matter what winter holiday you observe, these ideas may help to get your dose of happiness for the season:

One of the most challenging facets of managing Christmas is our difficulty in "seeing the forest for the (Christmas) trees."

If the hustle and bustle of accomplishing Herculean tasks involved in tripling our social schedule don't get us, then the necessity of smiling while experiencing extra frustrations surely will.

A major roadblock to our letting our tinsel of happiness shine during the Yuletide is the myth that it must shine all the time.

Learn by Watching the Tinsel

Ever notice the tinsel on your tree?  It alternates between dull and shining phases.

It would be hard to really feel the shine if there weren't moments and spaces without the shine to provide contrast.

Because it's the holiday season, we suddenly quite allowing ourselves the much-needed full range of human emotion, and insist that joy and happiness are all that's allowed this month.

No wonder depression increases with the season.

This gunny-sacking of negative feelings can end up bursting and casting a shadow on a person's fun and self-image.

Guilt sets in because a person is not able to be happy all of the time, as the season seems to indicate.

Even the excitement and happiness takes a toll on seniors and caregivers alike.

Relief and calmness are often called for along with an acceptance of the possibility of disappointments.

These are at times part and parcel of the season's happenings, as they are a natural part of life the rest of the year.

Empower Negative Feelings Along With all the Joy

Discussion about negative feelings reduces guilt and tension and prepares us to cope with such occasions.

Perhaps attempting too much happiness for ourselves in a short time can cloud our perception of what happiness really is.

The accompanying tension brings behavior and feelings that make perceptive people wonder if all this Yule Gruel is worth the effort!

A step in the right direction would be to let the tinsel of feelings have freedom of movement in ourselves, then in our children.

Express the same range of feelings as you do the rest of the year.

Try saying no without guilt to the events, which may bring you too much pressure.

Continue the Calm Rhythm of Routine

Budget your time so you're not dragging yourself around at the expense of eating, resting or customary closeness to friends and loved ones.

If you usually sit a bit before going out for the evening, do it even if it makes you late for the engagement.  Such routines help us survive daily life.

In addition, alternate exciting and calming activities so excessive tension doesn't build up without the relief valve of restful moments now and then.

You'll know you've wrestled with the "Spirit of Christmas Too Fast" and won:

  • If you can encourage yourself and your family to continue being yourselves.
  • If you're listening to your own drummer and not that of the media, storefronts, or even neighbors and friends.
  • If you can realistically aim for more cozy times than hard times.

AT FINE MOMENTS, here and there, you'll be privileged to catch a glimmer of tinsel shining and realize you are shining that Christmas tinsel!

It would be worth considering ways to reduce stresses of the season.

One way would be to enlist the services of Papa.com and enjoy the many ways a college student could ease the pressures of the season, or just help fill the loneliness so many feel this time of year.


senior winter depression

Helping Seniors Deal with Winter's Seasonal Depression

Seniors may find themselves noticing they can't seem to get into the holiday spirit. This may be a good time to adjust expectations and allow negative feelings to exist.

Older adults may not feel so excited about winter holidays as they used to. It can be caused by a number of things but can be dealt with as part of the range of normal feelings.

Progress can come from accepting the negative feelings as well as taking proactive steps to get through the season.

Possible Causes of Holiday Blues Among Older Adults

It can be as simple as financial and social pressures or as complex as a lingering loneliness or grief, which is intensified by all the talk about family closeness and love.

When individuals have lost family members or friends the sadness is often intensified during this time of year.

There is also reason to believe the decreased exposure to light adds to the mix due to shorter days and the tendency to stay inside during the winter.

At times it is a combination of Christmas holiday stress and seasonal affective disorder commonly referred to as SAD, where less light and winter blues can coincide with the holiday season.

In addition, many seniors' diet often contains excessive sugar and carbs, thus contributing to holiday weight gain as well as holiday blues.

Although older women are more at risk, anyone can experience a light case of holiday blues or even full-blown depression.

Increased and unrealistic expectations, whether they are self-imposed or absorbed from the constant pressure from the media barrage, only add to the madness.

Strategies to Help Seniors Get Through the Season

We each have our own culture and religious traditions, but no matter what you celebrate, there will be more social events than usual.

Fortunately, there are practical methods to help older people face each day more positively during the holiday seasons.

One way to rewire a person's thinking is to remind herself that "It isn't about me." Look at each holiday stress and ask what it is about. Often this cognitive path helps a senior discover what is really important – whether it be a holiday gathering or a challenging day.

In addition, seniors can stop to remember that Christmas doesn't have to be about commercialism.

  • Keep a schedule. Write a routine down. Since there's so much emotion in the air, choose not to act on winter depression only, but rather go by a schedule. Make it loose enough for extra activities, yet structured enough to give the day some shape. For example, set a time for meals.
  • Do some physical activity in the morning. Read or watch a movie after lunch.
  • Email or call at least one person, or socialize on Facebook or similar social networking media. Sometimes just a short chat can provide holiday relief.
  • Consider walking outside, at a local mall, or another place with sights to see; enjoy nature or just go people watching.
  • Have a cup of tea or coffee at a certain time each day.
  • Take a shower and dress warmly.
  • Open the shades, blinds or curtains. Sunlight has often been shown to be helpful in relieving seasonal affective depression. Some people even use seasonal affective disorder light therapy.

Tips for Seniors Surviving Seasonal Depression

Try using some of the following tips to beat the blues:

  • Take a daily walk. This gives something to do that will get an older person up and going, and it's good for the body as well as for reducing seasonal depression.
  • Find TV programs or music to enjoy.
  • Tend a garden or even a plant.
  • Sit on the porch or in the yard, soaking up the daylight and fresh air.
  • Get to know neighbors. Talk briefly with them, but don't be offended when they have their own things to do. Short visits do both the senior and the neighbor good.
  • Go to a park and feed the duck or just enjoy nature there.
  • Smile even if no one is looking. In fact, force a smile upon awakening. It can become a habit.
  • Don’t hesitate to seek professional help from a doctor or counselor.

Older Adults Can Have a Stress-Free Holiday

There are self-care methods for seniors to help themselves survive the depression and holiday stress. If a senior or boomer has no place to go, attend a church or community holiday meal.

Look in the paper for activities in the community. Volunteer at a soup kitchen or food pantry. Go buy just part of the week's food to be sure and have additional personal interaction.

It is OK to get away from the frenzy of activity. Sometimes older adults have simply had enough of the holiday madness.

For whatever reason, be it finances, family or other stresses, it can be helpful to live like it's not holiday season for a day or so. Read a book. Listen to favorite non-holiday music. Watch a movie or two.

After a day or so of respite, there may be enjoyment, or at least more comfortable tolerance of much of the holiday's hustle and bustle.

A rest away from it can help seniors be empowered to design the holiday they desire.

And when you are ready, Papa can pitch in and help with errands, transportation, or companionship, which can mean so much this time of year.


Father and daughter

Safety for Frail Seniors Who Come to Your Home

When inviting an elderly or frail senior to your home, it would be worth taking some precautions to ensure they can enjoy the occasion to the fullest without mishaps or fear of safety issues.

Planning to Have Frail Senior Guests in Your Home

When you are hosting events at home, plan for any frail guests. There is a need to consider handicapping conditions and other issues that could cause safety risks.

When a senior is worried about safety and is uncomfortable, it is difficult to have a good time.

By looking at the guest list, it can be determined which older adults may be at risk. This could include balance, the risk of tripping or falling, difficulty standing, and challenges with stairs or step-downs.

Remove throw rugs and work to make walking spaces free of electric cords and other clutter or any short standing objects that could present a fall risk to seniors with a reduced visual field or issues with balance.

It may help to move any statues or other standing items back to allow for more walk-through space.

Do a safety walk-through of the spaces your guests will occupy to be sure their wheelchair, walker, and/or cane friendly. Imagine yourself with a mobility issue coming to the place for the first time.

Take a look at decorative items, inspecting them for danger. Art, which protrudes from the walls, can be a challenge, especially in a dark hallway to the restroom.

Making Your House Safe for Guests at Risk for Tripping

Mark a spot in the driveway for this senior. Keep the parking area free of clutter, which could trip a walker who is unsteady. Move yard waste, which can precipitate a fall.

Be sure there is adequate lighting, both outside the house and inside including hall areas.

Night lights may help in this regard. Use a flashlight to personally escort this guest to and from the house to assure safe access.

Sidewalks need to be maintained in order to be visually available to the guest. If possible, avoid the stairs, but if they are part of your plan, keep them uncluttered and lit.

If your house has any steps either on the porch or by the entry inside, pay close attention to being nearby and giving verbal warnings as the frail guest navigates them.

The same applies to a sunken living room, as this can be a minefield to a person with a limited vision or balance issues.

Due to both allergies and risk of falling, dogs and cats need to be kept in another area as this person may have trouble when a pet runs in or out of their intended path.

Although these transitions may seem easy to you, they can be both frightening and hazardous for certain people.

Providing for the Comfort of Elderly Visitors While They Are in Your Home

Be sure the doorbell is in working order and respond to it promptly. Don’t rely on yelling; “Come on in” as people with reduced hearing may not hear that.

Also, make the doorbell accessible with adequate lighting and not blocking it with plants or objects of art, which can make it hard to reach.

If possible, install a higher toilet seat and/or grab bars to make the bathroom accessible. Thes

e raised toilet seats are affordable and can be found in the local hardware store.

Also, keep some type of light on in the bathroom. A lamp or bold night-light may help here.

In the sitting area, provide some chairs that are not too low to get out of easily and be sure that they have arms to make getting up easier.

If the guests are going to watch a DVD offer English subtitles. Those with a slight hearing loss may be grateful. Also, visual learners benefit from and appreciate the extra visual input.

 

When serving a meal, use a table of standard height with suitable chairs. Many modern tables are bar height with chairs o high that feet can’t touch the floor, and there may be no arms to hold onto while steadying oneself.

In making the menu, provide at least one alternative to spicy food as some older adults have tender digestive systems.

One option is to provide the spicy portion of the meal as a separate and well-marked dip or sauce to add as desired.

It is better to provide extra safety measures than not enough and regret it after an unfortunate incident.

Also, the comfort of seniors in your home can be vital to having a good time. Often they will not tell you they are miserable, but you may not have another opportunity to entertain them if they are uncomfortable.

Since there are so many holiday events, winter is a crucial time to deliver safety along with the punch and cookies!